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Beyond Barcelona
Local routes in Catalonia that have signed a collaboration agreement with the Barcelona Modernisme Route:
Colònia Güell, Santa Coloma de Cervelló
Jardins Artigas, la Pobla de Lillet
Manresa
Reus
Mataró-Argentona. The Puig i Cadafalch Route

Vallès Oriental, The Raspall Route
Sitges
Terrassa
Vilafranca del Penedès
These routes offer discounts to the Barcelona Modernisme Route. For further information, see the Route discount vouchers or call the Modernisme Centre on 902 076 621.
COLÒNIA GÜELL
     Santa Coloma de Cervelló

Colònia Güell. Santa Coloma de Cervelló

Address
Information and Welcome

Claudi Güell, s/n

Colònia Güell

08690 Santa Coloma de Cervelló
Opening hours and visits
Summer opening times, from May to October:

Monday to Friday, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Winter opening times, from November to April:

Monday to Friday, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturdaus, Sundays and public holidays, from 10a.m. to 3p.m.

Visiting is not permitted while religious services are being held (Sundays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and occasionally on Saturday morning).

If you wish to visit at the weekend, please phone first to confirm opening times. Closed on Good Friday, on 25 and 26 December, on 1 and 6 January
Information
Tel.: +34 936 305 807 

coloniaguell@adleisure.com

www.gaudicoloniaguell.org
Getting there
By train: FGC. Tel.: 932 051 515.
Barcelona-Colònia Güell, lines S4, S8 and S33, running from 8.30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (leaving every 15 minutes and taking an average of 22 minutes to get there).

By car: road BV-2002 between Sant Boi de Llobregat and Santa Coloma de Cervelló.

Further details
There is an introductory exhibition at the Information Centre.
Prices and discounts
Prices:

Guided tour of the Colonia Güell + church (2 hours) + entrance to the permanent exhibition: €11,50 per person.

Guided tour of the church (1 hour) + entrance to the permanent exhibition: €9,50 per person.

Guided tour of the Colonia Güell (1 hour) + entrance to the permanent exhibition: €9,50 per person.

Non-guided entrance to the church + entrance to the permanent exhibition: €7,00 per person.

Students, pensioners over 65 and large family groups: €5,50 per person.

Group prices (over 10 people): €5,00 per person.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 20% discount on all types of ticket.
Description
Colònia Güell: The church (crypt) and mill village

La Colònia Güell és una antiga colònia tèxtil fundada el 1890 per l’empresari i mecenes burgès Eusebi Güell a Santa Coloma de Cervelló. La colònia es concep a partir de la fàbrica com un conjunt urbà d’habitatges i serveis per als obrers (cases, escola, església, botiga, ateneu, etc.). La finalitat era aconseguir la pau social en un medi controlat per l’empresari. La Colònia Güell, però, es diferencia de la resta de colònies tèxtils per l’ús de la màquina de vapor com a font d’energia, per la separació de la fàbrica respecte de la zona residencial i per la intervenció d’arquitectes modernistes de primera fila. Per dur a terme aquest projecte, Eusebi Güell comptà amb la col·laboració d’Antoni Gaudí, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres i Joan Rubió i Bellvé. Els dos últims eren arquitectes modernistes de prestigi i col·laboradors de Gaudí i van ser els artífexs del projecte urbanístic i d’alguns dels edificis més singulars (Ca l’Ordal, Ca l’Espinal, l’Escola, Casa del Mestre, Centre de Sant Lluís), on van fer un impressionant desplegament dels recursos arquitectònics i decoratius més purament modernistes. Gaudí, en canvi, es va fer càrrec de l’església, popularment coneguda com la “cripta”, ja que, respecte al projecte inicial, només es van arribar a construir la planta baixa i el seu pòrtic (segons el projecte, l’església havia de tenir dos pisos amb una alçada de quaranta metres).

Colònia Güell is a former mill village founded in 1890 by the bourgeois businessman and patron Eusebi Güell in Santa Coloma de Cervelló. The village was conceived, starting with the textile factory, as an urban unit of dwellings and facilities for the workers (houses, school, church, shop, club, etc.). The aim was to achieve social peace in an environment controlled by the factory owner. Colònia Güell, however, differs from other mill villages in its use of the steam engine (rather than a river) as the source of power, the separation of the factory from the residential area and the fact that it was designed by leading Modernista architects. To carry out this project Eusebi Güell hired Antoni Gaudí, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellvé. The latter two, prestigious Modernista architects and collaborators of Gaudí, were responsible for the town planning and some of the most outstanding buildings (Ca l’Ordal, Ca l’Espinal, l’Escola, Casa del Mestre, or Centre de Sant Lluís), in which they made an impressive display of the most purely Modernista architectural and decorative resources. Gaudí, on the other hand, designed the church which is popularly known as the “crypt”, since only the ground floor and the portico were actually built, whereas according to the original project it was supposed to have two floors and rise 40 metres tall.

A set of Modernista buildings

Colònia Güell consists of the factory (which today houses several different firms and is in the process of being renovated), the urban centre and the church. In the Visitor’s Reception Centre there is an introductory exhibition to the tour. In addition to visiting the church -with or without a guide- you can also have a guided tour of the whole village to immerse yourself in the social and creative atmosphere that existed at the start of the 20th century. After this you may like to go for a gentle stroll through the pine woods surrounding the church and feel the peace impregnating the area.

A supreme work

The Colònia Güell church crypt is regarded by many as Gaudí’s masterwork. It was here that he experimented with, and succeeded in expressing, his most personal architectural language. He decided to use a system of inclined columns to bear the weight of the building without the need for buttresses or flying buttresses. He calculated the distribution of weights using a polyfunicular scale model, a method he invented for architectural design which made it possible, on a small scale, to foresee the loads and the arches that were needed to bear them. In 1969 the church was classified as a historical and artistic monument and today it is considered one of the essential pieces of 20th Century architecture in view of the major innovation consisting of the use of inclined columns and vaults in the shape of hyperbolic paraboloids and on account of the wonderful combination of materials.

The natural setting

Gaudí chose as the site for the church the highest hill in the residential part of the village amid a pine forest. As a result of the local materials used, the church and the inclined columns of the portico blend in visually with the surrounding countryside in perfect imitation of it. The walls and outer columns make use of a far-from-whimsical combination of different materials: cast iron slag, misshapen baked bricks, calcite stone and basalt. On the outer walls there is a great profusion of mosaics with religious symbols. The portico features an impressive basalt palm tree supporting the vaults. It was in the atrium of the porch that for the first time in history Gaudí experimented with hyperbolic paroboloid vaults. There is an extraordinary mosaic on the lintel of the main door.

A startling interior

Inside the oval ground plan crypt, the main features are the solution to the ceiling, based on brick ribs, the hyperbolic paraboloid walls and the four basalt columns which have a prehistoric air about them. All this atmosphere (it must be remembered that the church was never finished) is in sharp contrast to the colours of the stained glass windows. The pews and the holy water fonts, made with enormous shell shapes supported by wrought iron, were designed by Gaudí. The shrine, the altar of the Holy Family and the angels of the presbytery are by Josep M. Jujol.

The restoration

Work on restoring the church, which is being carried out in several stages, has been in progress since September 1999. The aims of the restoration are:

- To recover the original value of the work of Antoni Gaudí, rigorously preserving the original work while eliminating the elements added after he withdrew from it.

- To finish off the work that was left incomplete, giving it a formal finish by crowning the outer wall with a material clearly differentiated from the original.

- To give the building a functional finish by improving access with a new entrance axis and new outside stairs up to the terrace roof that is the result of replacing the old, dilapidated, temporary fibrocement roof.

- To reverse the deterioration caused by the passage of time by cleaning the building, weatherproofing the ceilings and restoring the mosaics and other deteriorated items.

So far the atrium, the porches, the outside walls and the mosaics have been restored. The floor of the entrance and the floor under the porches have been renewed. The unfinished ramp which was designed to provide access to the upper nave that was never built has been restored. A new terrace roof and outside staircase have been built. The exterior lighting of the church has also been installed. The most important jobs remaining to be done are restoration of the inside of the building and improving the church’s surroundings with larger grounds.

Colònia Güell Consortium


Colònia Güell: The church (crypt) and mill village
Colònia Güell is a former mill village founded in 1890 by the bourgeois businessman and patron Eusebi Güell in Santa Coloma de Cervelló. The village was conceived, starting with the textile factory, as an urban unit of dwellings and facilities for the workers (houses, school, church, shop, club, etc.). The aim was to achieve social peace in an environment controlled by the factory owner. Colònia Güell, however, differs from other mill villages in its use of the steam engine (rather than a river) as the source of power, the separation of the factory from the residential area and the fact that it was designed by leading Modernista architects. To carry out this project Eusebi Güell hired Antoni Gaudí, Francesc Berenguer i Mestres and Joan Rubió i Bellvé. The latter two, prestigious Modernista architects and collaborators of Gaudí, were responsible for the town planning and some of the most outstanding buildings (Ca l’Ordal, Ca l’Espinal, l’Escola, Casa del Mestre, or Centre de Sant Lluís), in which they made an impressive display of the most purely Modernista architectural and decorative resources. Gaudí, on the other hand, designed the church which is popularly known as the “crypt”, since only the ground floor and the portico were actually built, whereas according to the original project it was supposed to have two floors and rise 40 metres tall.


A set of Modernista buildings
Colònia Güell consists of the factory (which today houses several different firms and is in the process of being renovated), the urban centre and the church. In the Visitor’s Reception Centre there is an introductory exhibition to the tour. In addition to visiting the church -with or without a guide- you can also have a guided tour of the whole village to immerse yourself in the social and creative atmosphere that existed at the start of the 20th century. After this you may like to go for a gentle stroll through the pine woods surrounding the church and feel the peace impregnating the area.

A supreme work
The Colònia Güell church crypt is regarded by many as Gaudí’s masterwork. It was here that he experimented with, and succeeded in expressing, his most personal architectural language. He decided to use a system of inclined columns to bear the weight of the building without the need for buttresses or flying buttresses. He calculated the distribution of weights using a polyfunicular scale model, a method he invented for architectural design which made it possible, on a small scale, to foresee the loads and the arches that were needed to bear them. In 1969 the church was classified as a historical and artistic monument and today it is considered one of the essential pieces of 20th Century architecture in view of the major innovation consisting of the use of inclined columns and vaults in the shape of hyperbolic paraboloids and on account of the wonderful combination of materials.

The natural setting
Gaudí chose as the site for the church the highest hill in the residential part of the village amid a pine forest. As a result of the local materials used, the church and the inclined columns of the portico blend in visually with the surrounding countryside in perfect imitation of it. The walls and outer columns make use of a far-from-whimsical combination of different materials: cast iron slag, misshapen baked bricks, calcite stone and basalt. On the outer walls there is a great profusion of mosaics with religious symbols. The portico features an impressive basalt palm tree supporting the vaults. It was in the atrium of the porch that for the first time in history Gaudí experimented with hyperbolic paroboloid vaults. There is an extraordinary mosaic on the lintel of the main door .

A startling interior
Inside the oval ground plan crypt, the main features are the solution to the ceiling, based on brick ribs, the hyperbolic paraboloid walls and the four basalt columns which have a prehistoric air about them. All this atmosphere (it must be remembered that the church was never finished) is in sharp contrast to the colours of the stained glass windows. The pews and the holy water fonts, made with enormous shell shapes supported by wrought iron, were designed by Gaudí. The shrine, the altar of the Holy Family and the angels of the presbytery are by Josep M. Jujol .

The restoration
Work on restoring the church, which is being carried out in several stages, has been in progress since September 1999. The aims of the restoration are:

  • To recover the original value of the work of Antoni Gaudí, rigorously preserving the original work while eliminating the elements added after he withdrew from it.
  • To finish off the work that was left incomplete, giving it a formal finish by crowning the outer wall with a material clearly differentiated from the original.
  • To give the building a functional finish by improving access with a new entrance axis and new outside stairs up to the terrace roof that is the result of replacing the old, dilapidated, temporary fibrocement roof.
  • To reverse the deterioration caused by the passage of time by cleaning the building, weatherproofing the ceilings and restoring the mosaics and other deteriorated items.

So far the atrium, the porches, the outside walls and the mosaics have been restored. The floor of the entrance and the floor under the porches have been renewed. The unfinished ramp which was designed to provide access to the upper nave that was never built has been restored. A new terrace roof and outside staircase have been built. The exterior lighting of the church has also been installed. The most important jobs remaining to be done are restoration of the inside of the building and improving the church’s surroundings with larger grounds.

Colònia Güell Consortium

JARDINS ARTIGAS (ARTIGAS GARDENS)
     La Pobla de Lillet

Jardins Artigas. La Pobla de Lillet

Address
Jardins Artigas

Estació del tren de La Pobla de Lillet

La Pobla de Lillet.
Opening hours and visits
Opening hours:

From November to Easter: from 10am to 2pm on weekends and public holidays. Check with the Tourist Office for weekdays. Every day from 10am to 2pm and from 3.30pm to 6.30pm in July and August.

Rest of the year: from 10am to 2pm and 3.30pm to 6pm on weekends and public holidays. Check with the Tourist Office for weekdays.

Private visits can be arranged all year round
Information
Tel.: 687 998 541

tur.lillet@diba.cat

www.poblalillet.cat
Getting there
By bus: ALSA company (tel. 902 422 242).

By car: road C-16, or la C-17 plus C-26.
Further details
Reduced price for groups and for schools.
Prices and discounts
Prices.

Adults: €4.25.

Students and seniors: €3.80.

6 to 13 years of age: €2.10.

0 to 5 years of age: free.

Groups (over 30 persons): €3.30 per person, includes guided tour.

School groups (over 30 persons): €2.60 per person, includes guided tour.

Groups of less than 30 persons: €26.00/group.

Please book in advance.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 15% off the general entrance price.
Description
Jardins Artigas (1904)

Gaudí designed the gardens known as Jardí de Can Artigas, together with a house-cum-refuge, in the nearby Serra del Catllaràs range in 1904. La Pobla de Lillet is a municipality in the comarca, or shire, of El Berguedà that has 1,558 inhabitants.

Rediscovering the work

The garden, which is private property, was abandoned from 1939 to 1989. Because of this, and the fact that the terrain is not very accessible, it remained forgotten throughout this time. Besides, the lack of documents confirming that it had actually been designed by Gaudí meant that it was not taken into consideration as part of his work. In addition to this, the house known as Xalet de Catllaràs was renovated in the 1980s with questionable criteria that made it lose all its decorative features. However, in 1991 the Càtedra Gaudí (Gaudí Chair, a univeristy research centre) began researching the two works and then tackled the project of renovating the gardens. The Chair has reconstructed a plausible hypothesis according to which it was Gaudí who designed the gardens and this has helped to make it one of the most visited points of architectural and artistic interest in El Berguedà.

A commission from Eusebi Güell

Although aesthetically there appear to be certain similarities with Park Güell, Jardins Artigas, as they are today, are the only humid gardens designed by the eminent architect.
At the beginning of the 20th century, the first company producing Portland cement in Spain was set up in Clot del Moro (Castellar de N’Hug). This company, Asland, was headed by the businessman Eusebi Güell i Bacigalupi. As the factory was being built (1901-1904), various service industries grew up around it, such as the coal mines in Serra del Catllaràs to feed the Asland cement furnaces. Count Güell commissioned Gaudí to design a house in Catllaràs for the engineers and professionals in charge of managing and running the coal mines.

In order to visit the place where the house was to be put up, Antoni Gaudí went to stay with the Artigas family who were in the textile business. During the two days he spent in La Pobla, they told him that they would very much like to have a garden behind their factory. Out of gratitude for the family’s hospitality, Antoni Gaudí made them a sketch. It is from this sketch that Jardins Artigas came into being.


Similarities with Park Güell

It should be said that in 1905 Gaudí was working in Barcelona on the construction of Park Güell, so the sketch he made of the garden took its inspiration from this park. It seems that when he returned to Barcelona with the design for the Xalet de Catllaràs, Gaudí himself sent two workers to La Pobla de Lillet to start work on the garden he had drawn.

A wild environment

The place where Jardins Artigas were built is in a very wild environment with the river Llobregat running between large jagged rocks and abundant indigenous vegetation. The architectural structures are the same as in Park Güell, but the materials used to build the garden were taken from the mountainous area near the Pyrenees where La Pobla de Lillet is situated. Therefore the materials you will see in the garden are stone slabs, pumice stone, pebbles from the river and marl, together with Portland cement which was used for the garden’s balustrades and naturalistic murals.
Besides the Llobregat river, there are plenty of water sources, with a large number of fountains spouting from the springs of natural water running down to the river. All that Gaudí did was to decorate them and make them into fountains with figures from which they take their names, such as La Cascada (The Waterfall), Font del Bou (Bull Fountain), Font del Lleó (The Lion Fountain) and Font de la Gruta (Grotto Fountain). The bridges, Pont d’Escala and Pont dels Arcs, were built to provide a way across the Llobregat and link the two banks of the river. Standing on a pronounced blade of rock overlooking the whole garden is La Glorieta, a summerhouse with a magnificent view.

There are various symbols to look out for in the garden such as the Four Evangelists presided over by the figure of an eagle majestically watching over the garden from the side of the Glorieta del Bou (Bull’s Summerhouse), the lion and the Angel, which originally stood inside the waterfall, but has not been reproduced. Snakes protect the only entrance Gaudí designed for the garden. Other points of interest include the caryatides with the figure of man and woman, the fisherman’s corner, the picnic area with its naturalistic mural and the bamboo reeds.
Ajuntament de La Pobla de Lillet
(La Pobla de Lillet Town Council)


Jardins Artigas (1904)

Gaudí designed the gardens known as Jardí de Can Artigas, together with a house-cum-refuge, in the nearby Serra del Catllaràs range in 1904. La Pobla de Lillet is a municipality in the comarca, or shire, of El Berguedà that has 1,558 inhabitants.


Rediscovering the work
The garden, which is private property, was abandoned from 1939 to 1989. Because of this, and the fact that the terrain is not very accessible, it remained forgotten throughout this time. Besides, the lack of documents confirming that it had actually been designed by Gaudí meant that it was not taken into consideration as part of his work. In addition to this, the house known as Xalet de Catllaràs was renovated in the 1980s with questionable criteria that made it lose all its decorative features. However, in 1991 the Càtedra Gaudí (Gaudí Chair, a univeristy research centre) began researching the two works and then tackled the project of renovating the gardens. The Chair has reconstructed a plausible hypothesis according to which it was Gaudí who designed the gardens and this has helped to make it one of the most visited points of architectural and artistic interest in El Berguedà.

A commission from Eusebi Güell
Although aesthetically there appear to be certain similarities with Park Güell, Jardins Artigas, as they are today, are the only humid gardens designed by the eminent architect.
At the beginning of the 20th century, the first company producing Portland cement in Spain was set up in Clot del Moro (Castellar de N’Hug). This company, Asland, was headed by the businessman Eusebi Güell i Bacigalupi. As the factory was being built (1901-1904), various service industries grew up around it, such as the coal mines in Serra del Catllaràs to feed the Asland cement furnaces. Count Güell commissioned Gaudí to design a house in Catllaràs for the engineers and professionals in charge of managing and running the coal mines.

In order to visit the place where the house was to be put up, Antoni Gaudí went to stay with the Artigas family who were in the textile business. During the two days he spent in La Pobla, they told him that they would very much like to have a garden behind their factory. Out of gratitude for the family’s hospitality, Antoni Gaudí made them a sketch. It is from this sketch that Jardins Artigas came into being.

Similarities with Park Güell
It should be said that in 1905 Gaudí was working in Barcelona on the construction of Park Güell, so the sketch he made of the garden took its inspiration from this park. It seems that when he returned to Barcelona with the design for the Xalet de Catllaràs, Gaudí himself sent two workers to La Pobla de Lillet to start work on the garden he had drawn.

A wild environment
The place where Jardins Artigas were built is in a very wild environment with the river Llobregat running between large jagged rocks and abundant indigenous vegetation. The architectural structures are the same as in Park Güell, but the materials used to build the garden were taken from the mountainous area near the Pyrenees where La Pobla de Lillet is situated. Therefore the materials you will see in the garden are stone slabs, pumice stone, pebbles from the river and marl, together with Portland cement which was used for the garden’s balustrades and naturalistic murals.
Besides the Llobregat river, there are plenty of water sources, with a large number of fountains spouting from the springs of natural water running down to the river. All that Gaudí did was to decorate them and make them into fountains with figures from which they take their names, such as La Cascada (The Waterfall), Font del Bou (Bull Fountain), Font del Lleó (The Lion Fountain) and Font de la Gruta (Grotto Fountain). The bridges, Pont d’Escala and Pont dels Arcs, were built to provide a way across the Llobregat and link the two banks of the river. Standing on a pronounced blade of rock overlooking the whole garden is La Glorieta, a summerhouse with a magnificent view.

There are various symbols to look out for in the garden such as the Four Evangelists presided over by the figure of an eagle majestically watching over the garden from the side of the Glorieta del Bou (Bull’s Summerhouse), the lion and the Angel, which originally stood inside the waterfall, but has not been reproduced. Snakes protect the only entrance Gaudí designed for the garden. Other points of interest include the caryatides with the figure of man and woman, the fisherman’s corner, the picnic area with its naturalistic mural and the bamboo reeds.


Ajuntament de La Pobla de Lillet
(La Pobla de Lillet Town Council)




MANRESA
Manresa

Address
Tourist Office

Plaça Major, 10
Information
Tel.: 938 784 090 Fax: 938 784 156 turisme@ajmanresa.cat www.manresaturisme.cat
Getting there
By train: RENFE and FGC, both leaving from Palaça Catalunya.
By bus: Autocars Julià company (tel.: 934 026 937).
By car: road C-58 to Terrassa, then C-16 or C-55 to Manresa.

Further details
Monday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Fridays and Saturdays from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. too.

Closed 1 and 6 January, and 24 June and

24, 25, 26 and 31 December.

Reduced prices for groups. If you prefer to walk the visit on your own,the Tourist Office gives out free maps of Manresa’s Modernisme.
Prices and discounts
Discount of the Modernisme Route: 15% off all prices.
Description
Manresa

During the 19th century, Manresa, like other small towns and villages along the rivers Llobregat and Cardener, grew into an industrial town. The first textile factories appeared and, as a result, the first lineages of businessmen. The town was transformed. The last of the walls around it were pulled down and much wider streets were built. Passeig Pere III, opened during the 19th century, became the favourite residential avenue of the new bourgeoisie. The industrialists who had made their fortune thanks to the textile mills, had houses built there that followed the Modernista aesthetics. Most of these buildings were designed by local architects who took their cue from the dominant trend in Barcelona. Of these, two in particular stood out: Ignasi Oms i Ponsa and Alexandre Soler i March. Ignasi Oms is regarded as the foremost representative of Modernisme in Manresa. He worked with Domènech i Montaner and for many years was the municipal architect. Manresa is full of his buildings and there is even a street named after him, which contains four of his works. Like Ignasi Oms, Alexandre Soler trained in Barcelona and was also disciple of Domènech i Montaner. One of the most important works for which he was responsible was the extension of Santa Clara Convent.


Modernista Route

The Modernista route is centred mainly on the area of Plaça Sant Domènec, Passeig Pere III and Carrer del Born.

Farmàcia Esteve (1926) and Quiosc de l’Arpa (1917)

These are clear examples of Modernisme as applied to shops and urban furniture. They were designed by the architect Josep Firmat. It is worth noting the stained glass windows and the wood and wrought iron sculptures of the chemists’.


Sastreria Tuneu

This tailors’ shop still boasts the Modernista signs designed by the painter Francesc Cuixart in 1906.


Casa Torrents or Buresa

This building was designed by Ignasi Oms in 1905, a commission by one of the wealthiest families of the time, the Torrents. It is a re-creation of a palatial house in Neo-Gothic style with four storeys and a tower on either side of it. A central body juts out of the façade with a large enclosed balcony on the first floor and four pinnacles and an image of the Holy Family, a typical feature of many Modernista buildings, at the top. Some of the rooms still retain their luxurious Modernista decoration.


Casal Regionalista

Designed by Alexandre Soler in 1918. With its sober, regular style it moves away from the Modernista postulates and closer to those of the movement known as Noucentisme.


Casino

Situated right in the middle of Passeig Pere III, it is the main Modernista building in Manresa. Designed by Ignasi Oms, it was constructed in 1906. It was known as El Casino dels senyors (the Gentlemen’s Casino) as it functioned as a social club and gambling place for the well-to-do of the time. The Casino closed during the sixties and the building went into a period of decline. Later on, however, it was bought by the local authority and today houses a public library and a cultural centre. The Casino is a transitional work on the way to fully-fledged Modernisme. The façade has a classical structure, although it also contains Modernista elements such as the windows, balconies and ornamental motifs. Some of the rooms inside it, now used as reading rooms, still have their original stained glass windows and extremely rich ornamentation.


Casa Lluvià

Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1908, it is regarded as the purest example of Modernista architecture in Manresa. Unlike the Casino, Casa Lluvià moves away from classicism and here the architect combines a central body with two towers of different proportions and heights. The façade retains its typically Modernista ornamentation while the interior of the building has also kept some Modernista elements such as the stone columns with naïf-style reliefs and paintings. It is currently home to the Bages i Berguedà Architects’ Association.




Casa Torra

Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1910, it stands out because it succeeds in the idea of a detached house that is nevertheless perfectly integrated into the urban space.

Casa Gabernet Espanyol

Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1898. This is an example of historicist Modernisme combining Gothic and Romanesque elements.


Casa Padró

This building was designed in 1918 by Bernat Pejoan and stands on a corner of Passeig Pere III. It now contains shops.


Casa Padró Domènech

Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1903.


Col·legi Asil dels Infants

Designed by Ignasi Oms and built between 1901 and 1911 it falls within the realm of historicist Modernisme.


Casa Armengou

Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1889. It is a mixture of eclectic and Modernista styles.


Institut Lluís de Peguera

Designed by Alexandre Soler. It is regarded as belonging to the Modernista style in transition towards Noucentisme. Work on it began in 1907, but it was not completed until 1927.


Convent de Santa Clara

This is a building of medieval origin and it still has a Romanesque doorway. In 1904 the architect Alexandre Soler designed an extension to the building drawing his inspiration from the Gothic.


Oficina de Turisme de Manresa. Ajuntament de Manresa
(Manresa Tourist Office. Manresa City Council)



Manresa

During the 19th century, Manresa, like other small towns and villages along the rivers Llobregat and Cardener, grew into an industrial town. The first textile factories appeared and, as a result, the first lineages of businessmen. The town was transformed. The last of the walls around it were pulled down and much wider streets were built. Passeig Pere III, opened during the 19th century, became the favourite residential avenue of the new bourgeoisie. The industrialists who had made their fortune thanks to the textile mills, had houses built there that followed the Modernista aesthetics. Most of these buildings were designed by local architects who took their cue from the dominant trend in Barcelona. Of these, two in particular stood out: Ignasi Oms i Ponsa and Alexandre Soler i March. Ignasi Oms is regarded as the foremost representative of Modernisme in Manresa. He worked with Domènech i Montaner and for many years was the municipal architect. Manresa is full of his buildings and there is even a street named after him, which contains four of his works. Like Ignasi Oms, Alexandre Soler trained in Barcelona and was also disciple of Domènech i Montaner. One of the most important works for which he was responsible was the extension of Santa Clara Convent.


Modernista Route
The Modernista route is centred mainly on the area of Plaça Sant Domènec, Passeig Pere III and Carrer del Born.

Farmàcia Esteve (1926) and Quiosc de l’Arpa (1917)
These are clear examples of Modernisme as applied to shops and urban furniture. They were designed by the architect Josep Firmat. It is worth noting the stained glass windows and the wood and wrought iron sculptures of the chemists’.

Sastreria Tuneu
This tailors’ shop still boasts the Modernista signs designed by the painter Francesc Cuixart in 1906.

Casa Torrents o Buresa
This building was designed by Ignasi Oms in 1905, a commission by one of the wealthiest families of the time, the Torrents. It is a re-creation of a palatial house in Neo-Gothic style with four storeys and a tower on either side of it. A central body juts out of the façade with a large enclosed balcony on the first floor and four pinnacles and an image of the Holy Family, a typical feature of many Modernista buildings, at the top. Some of the rooms still retain their luxurious Modernista decoration.

Casal Regionalista
Designed by Alexandre Soler in 1918. With its sober, regular style it moves away from the Modernista postulates and closer to those of the movement known as Noucentisme.

Casino
Situated right in the middle of Passeig Pere III, it is the main Modernista building in Manresa. Designed by Ignasi Oms, it was constructed in 1906. It was known as El Casino dels senyors (the Gentlemen’s Casino) as it functioned as a social club and gambling place for the well-to-do of the time. The Casino closed during the sixties and the building went into a period of decline. Later on, however, it was bought by the local authority and today houses a public library and a cultural centre. The Casino is a transitional work on the way to fully-fledged Modernisme. The façade has a classical structure, although it also contains Modernista elements such as the windows, balconies and ornamental motifs. Some of the rooms inside it, now used as reading rooms, still have their original stained glass windows and extremely rich ornamentation.

Casa Lluvià
Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1908, it is regarded as the purest example of Modernista architecture in Manresa. Unlike the Casino, Casa Lluvià moves away from classicism and here the architect combines a central body with two towers of different proportions and heights. The façade retains its typically Modernista ornamentation while the interior of the building has also kept some Modernista elements such as the stone columns with naïf-style reliefs and paintings. It is currently home to the Bages i Berguedà Architects’ Association.

Casa Torra
Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1910, it stands out because it succeeds in the idea of a detached house that is nevertheless perfectly integrated into the urban space.

Casa Gabernet Espanyol
Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1898. This is an example of historicist Modernisme combining Gothic and Romanesque elements.

Casa Padró
This building was designed in 1918 by Bernat Pejoan and stands on a corner of Passeig Pere III. It now contains shops.

Casa Padró Domènech
Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1903.

Col·legi Asil dels Infants
Designed by Ignasi Oms and built between 1901 and 1911 it falls within the realm of historicist Modernisme.

Casa Armengou
Designed by Ignasi Oms in 1889. It is a mixture of eclectic and Modernista styles.

Instituto Lluís de Peguera
Designed by Alexandre Soler. It is regarded as belonging to the Modernista style in transition towards Noucentisme. Work on it began in 1907, but it was not completed until 1927.

Convento de Santa Clara
This is a building of medieval origin and it still has a Romanesque doorway. In 1904 the architect Alexandre Soler designed an extension to the building drawing his inspiration from the Gothic.

Oficina de Turisme de Manresa. Ajuntament de Manresa
(Manresa Tourist Office. Manresa City Council)

 

 

REUS

Reus, a Modernista stage

Reus, Gaudí’s city, 100 kilometres from Barcelona and eight from the Costa Daurada, is today a major commercial and cultural hub of the south of Catalonia.

In the 18th century, the population of the town grew rapidly to become the second largest city in Catalonia as the result of the brandy trade, for which it was an international reference point, as evidenced by the famous joke-phrase of an alleged “Reus, París i Londres (London)” axis. It was shortly after this, around the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, that the great Modernista buildings, which you can still see today and which make Reus a veritable Modernista stage, were erected.
Reus

Address

Gaudí Centre and Oficina de Turisme

Pl. Mercadal, 3

43201 Reus


Opening hours and visits

Gaudí Centre


The Gaudí Centre is a new interpretation centre enabling the public of all ages to understand in an entertaining way the keys to Gaudí’s architecture, discover how his creative genius was formed and get to know the city and the environment that inspired him. Through a wide variety of resources (audiovisuals, interactive sensory models, sets, documents and personal objects) the public is introduced to Gaudí’s private world in an educational and participatory way, opening up the senses and the mind to new experiences. The Gaudí Centre also has a restaurant, a shop and a tourist office. It can be visited with an audio guide (available in Catalan, Spanish, French and English).


Opening hours:


From January to June 14th and September 16th to December:

Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Sundays and public holidays: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.



From 15th June to September 15th:

Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays and public holidays: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.


 


Tour of Casa Navàs and Institut Pere Mata. You must book in advance. Consult the Routes’ prices and times by telephoning the Tourist Office on (+34) 977 010 670


* 29/06 and 25/09 are public holidays in Reus

* The Centre is closed on 01/01, 06/01, 25/12 and 26/12.

 

Reus Modernisme Route

Information

Gaudí Centre

Tel.: (+34) 977 010 670, infoturisme@reus.cat; www.gaudicentre.com


Tourist Office

Tel.: (+34) 977 010 670, infoturisme@reus.cat; www.reus.net/turisme


Getting there
By train: RENFE from Sants and Passeig de Gràcia stations.
By bus: La Hispano Igualadina company (tel.: 938 044 451), leaving from Ronda Universitat.
By car: road N-340 or highway AP-7 (exit no. 34).
Per carretera: N-340 o autopista AP-7 sortida 34.

Further details
The guided visit is a walking tour to see the façades of the main Modernista buildings and includes access to the interior of Casa Gasull, the garden of Casa Rull and the shop of Casa Navàs, all by Lluís Domènech i Montaner. Then a bus ride takes you to Hospital Pere Mata where you visit pavillion 6. Also by Domènech, the decorative richness of this hospital is especially noteworthy in this pavillion. Entrance to Casa Navàs depends on the owners’ availability:it is an optional visit not included in the ticket.


Prices and discounts

Gaudí Centre


Children aged 0 to 6 years: free

Adults: €7.00

Children aged 7 to 14 and pensioners: €4.00


Modernisme Route discount:


    2 for 1 on the ticket to the Gaudí Centre.


    2 for 1 on the ticket to the Institut Pere Mata.


Description
Reus, a Modernista stage

Reus, Gaudí’s city, 100 kilometres from Barcelona and eight from the Costa Daurada, is today a major commercial and cultural hub of the south of Catalonia.

In the 18th century, the population of the town grew rapidly to become the second largest city in Catalonia as the result of the brandy trade, for which it was an international reference point, as evidenced by the famous joke-phrase of an alleged “Reus, París i Londres (London)” axis. It was shortly after this, around the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, that the great Modernista buildings, which you can still see today and which make Reus a veritable Modernista stage, were erected.

The universally famous architect Antoni Gaudí i Cornet was born in Reus on 25th June 1852. It was in this city that the future architect lived as a child and teenager, made friends and went to school before moving to Barcelona. Some of his closest collaborators, such as the architects Joan Rubió i Bellvé, Domènec Sugranyes and Francesc Berenguer, and several of his future clients also came from the Reus area.

The city still retains the memory of the places the young Gaudí frequented during the time he lived in the town: the house where he was born, the church where he was baptised, the school he went to, the places where he used to meet his friends and collaborators. In short, the streets, squares, places and landscapes of the city that shaped the education of its great creative genius.

We suggest you also visit the “Gaudí & Reus” exhibition at the Museu Salvador Vilaseca which takes you through the origins of Gaudí and his family and introduces you to some of the most significant aspects of his personality and his way of understanding the world and architecture.

But it was the arrival of Lluís Domènech i Montaner, the other great architect of the era, that marked the start of the brilliant Modernista period in Reus when he began the plans to build the Pere Mata Psychiatric Institute in 1898. This was followed by other commissions and it was in Reus that Lluís Domènech i Montaner constructed more buildings than anywhere else apart from Barcelona. Of these, the most important are:


Pere Mata Institute (1898)

An innovative construction project involving an interesting combination of materials featuring brick, stone, wrought iron, ceramic and stained glass, and an innovative approach to patient care, in which the architect used a system of independent pavilions, something he repeated later on at the Hospital de Sant Pau in Barcelona. Pavilion number six, with its rich ornamentation, is the most valuable from an artistic point of view, as it retains its spectacular original Modernista decorative repertoire. The Pere Mata Institute, whose interior you can visit, is regarded as one of the jewels of Catalan Modernisme.


Casa Navàs (1901-1907)

Together with the Pere Mata Institute, this is the best example of the city’s architecture. It was commissioned by Joaquim Navàs, a local merchant. The beautiful façade, with different architectural and decorative elements inspired by Gothic and Plateresque, was damaged by a bomb during the Civil War, but the interior still keeps its magnificent decoration. The shop on the ground floor of the building is also very interesting, as the construction has survived virtually intact, and you can look round inside it.


Casa Rull (1900)

This house was designed for Pere Rull, a notary, and you can recognise various symbols on the façade to do with the original owner’s profession. Of special note are the angle formed by the two main façades and the elegant balcony with floral elements on the first floor. You can also visit the garden of this house.
Casa Gasull (1911)

This house was built for Fèlix Gasull, the owner of an oil-exporting firm, and contained the company’s warehouses as well as the family dwelling. This building is an early example of Modernisme combined with an incipient and sober Noucentisme.


There is no doubt that Modernista buildings erected in Reus were influenced by the architectural style of Domènech i Montaner. This effect is specially evident in the works designed by Pere Caselles, a municipal architect who had already worked with Domènech on the Pere Mata Institute and who designed a large number of both public and private buildings, including the Prat de la Riba Schools (1911), Casa Grau (1910), Casa Sagarra (1908), Casa Munné (1904), Casa Laguna (1904), Casa Tomàs Jordi (1909) and Casa Punyed (1900), and various industrial buildings such as the Abbatoir (begun by Francesc Borràs in 1889), and the Oenological Station (1906). Of the other architects who worked in Reus during this period, the most important were Joan Rubió i Bellvé, who was influenced by Gaudí’s style (Xalet Serra, 1911; Tuberculosis Dispensary, 1926, and Casa Serra, 1924), and Pere Domènech i Roura, the son of Domènech i Montaner (Casa Marco, 1926).

Patronat Municipal de Turisme i Comerç de Reus
(Reus Municipal Board of Tourism and Trade)


The universally famous architect Antoni Gaudí i Cornet was born in Reus on 25th June 1852. It was in this city that the future architect lived as a child and teenager, made friends and went to school before moving to Barcelona. Some of his closest collaborators, such as the architects Joan Rubió i Bellvé, Domènec Sugranyes and Francesc Berenguer, and several of his future clients also came from the Reus area.

The city still retains the memory of the places the young Gaudí frequented during the time he lived in the town: the house where he was born, the church where he was baptised, the school he went to, the places where he used to meet his friends and collaborators. In short, the streets, squares, places and landscapes of the city that shaped the education of its great creative genius.

We suggest you also visit the “Gaudí & Reus” exhibition at the Museu Salvador Vilaseca which takes you through the origins of Gaudí and his family and introduces you to some of the most significant aspects of his personality and his way of understanding the world and architecture.

But it was the arrival of Lluís Domènech i Montaner, the other great architect of the era, that marked the start of the brilliant Modernista period in Reus when he began the plans to build the Pere Mata Psychiatric Institute in 1898. This was followed by other commissions and it was in Reus that Lluís Domènech i Montaner constructed more buildings than anywhere else apart from Barcelona. Of these, the most important are:

Pere Mata Institute (1898)
An innovative construction project involving an interesting combination of materials featuring brick, stone, wrought iron, ceramic and stained glass, and an innovative approach to patient care, in which the architect used a system of independent pavilions, something he repeated later on at the Hospital de Sant Pau in Barcelona. Pavilion number six, with its rich ornamentation, is the most valuable from an artistic point of view, as it retains its spectacular original Modernista decorative repertoire. The Pere Mata Institute, whose interior you can visit, is regarded as one of the jewels of Catalan Modernisme.

Casa Navàs (1901-1907)
Together with the Pere Mata Institute, this is the best example of the city’s architecture. It was commissioned by Joaquim Navàs, a local merchant. The beautiful façade, with different architectural and decorative elements inspired by Gothic and Plateresque, was damaged by a bomb during the Civil War, but the interior still keeps its magnificent decoration. The shop on the ground floor of the building is also very interesting, as the construction has survived virtually intact, and you can look round inside it.

Casa Rull (1900)
This house was designed for Pere Rull, a notary, and you can recognise various symbols on the façade to do with the original owner’s profession. Of special note are the angle formed by the two main façades and the elegant balcony with floral elements on the first floor. You can also visit the garden of this house.

Casa Gasull (1911)
This house was built for Fèlix Gasull, the owner of an oil-exporting firm, and contained the company’s warehouses as well as the family dwelling. This building is an early example of Modernisme combined with an incipient and sober Noucentisme.

There is no doubt that Modernista buildings erected in Reus were influenced by the architectural style of Domènech i Montaner. This effect is specially evident in the works designed by Pere Caselles, a municipal architect who had already worked with Domènech on the Pere Mata Institute and who designed a large number of both public and private buildings, including the Prat de la Riba Schools (1911), Casa Grau (1910), Casa Sagarra (1908), Casa Munné (1904), Casa Laguna (1904), Casa Tomàs Jordi (1909) and Casa Punyed (1900), and various industrial buildings such as the Abbatoir (begun by Francesc Borràs in 1889), and the Oenological Station (1906). Of the other architects who worked in Reus during this period, the most important were Joan Rubió i Bellvé, who was influenced by Gaudí’s style (Xalet Serra, 1911; Tuberculosis Dispensary, 1926, and Casa Serra, 1924), and Pere Domènech i Roura, the son of Domènech i Montaner (Casa Marco, 1926).

Patronat Municipal de Turisme i Comerç de Reus
(Reus Municipal Board of Tourism and Trade)

 

 

MATARÓ-ARGENTONA. THE PUIG I CADAFALCH ROUTE.

Ruta Puig i Cadafalch
Modernisme was a social and political movement of great magnitude with a major impact on the arts that spread throughout Catalonia, at the same time as it did across the rest of Europe and America (where it was more commonly known as Art Nouveau or the New Style), between the final third of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century. In Catalonia it made itself felt not only in the big cities, but also in other towns such as Mataró, Argentona and Canet de Mar whose historical and social characteristics made them ideal places for such trends to manifest themselves.

Reus

Address

Gaudí Centre and Oficina de Turisme

Pl. Mercadal, 3

43201 Reus


Opening hours and visits

Gaudí Centre


The Gaudí Centre is a new interpretation centre enabling the public of all ages to understand in an entertaining way the keys to Gaudí’s architecture, discover how his creative genius was formed and get to know the city and the environment that inspired him. Through a wide variety of resources (audiovisuals, interactive sensory models, sets, documents and personal objects) the public is introduced to Gaudí’s private world in an educational and participatory way, opening up the senses and the mind to new experiences. The Gaudí Centre also has a restaurant, a shop and a tourist office. It can be visited with an audio guide (available in Catalan, Spanish, French and English).


Opening hours:


From January to June 14th and September 16th to December:

Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m. Sundays and public holidays: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.



From 15th June to September 15th:

Monday to Saturday: 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sundays and public holidays: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.


 


Tour of Casa Navàs and Institut Pere Mata. You must book in advance. Consult the Routes’ prices and times by telephoning the Tourist Office on (+34) 977 010 670


* 29/06 and 25/09 are public holidays in Reus

* The Centre is closed on 01/01, 06/01, 25/12 and 26/12.

 

Reus Modernisme Route

Information

Gaudí Centre

Tel.: (+34) 977 010 670, infoturisme@reus.cat; www.gaudicentre.com


Tourist Office

Tel.: (+34) 977 010 670, infoturisme@reus.cat; www.reus.net/turisme


Getting there
By train: RENFE from Sants and Passeig de Gràcia stations.
By bus: La Hispano Igualadina company (tel.: 938 044 451), leaving from Ronda Universitat.
By car: road N-340 or highway AP-7 (exit no. 34).
Per carretera: N-340 o autopista AP-7 sortida 34.

Further details
The guided visit is a walking tour to see the façades of the main Modernista buildings and includes access to the interior of Casa Gasull, the garden of Casa Rull and the shop of Casa Navàs, all by Lluís Domènech i Montaner. Then a bus ride takes you to Hospital Pere Mata where you visit pavillion 6. Also by Domènech, the decorative richness of this hospital is especially noteworthy in this pavillion. Entrance to Casa Navàs depends on the owners’ availability:it is an optional visit not included in the ticket.


Prices and discounts

Gaudí Centre


Children aged 0 to 6 years: free

Adults: €7.00

Children aged 7 to 14 and pensioners: €4.00


Modernisme Route discount:


    2 for 1 on the ticket to the Gaudí Centre.


    2 for 1 on the ticket to the Institut Pere Mata.


Description
Reus, a Modernista stage

Reus, Gaudí’s city, 100 kilometres from Barcelona and eight from the Costa Daurada, is today a major commercial and cultural hub of the south of Catalonia.

In the 18th century, the population of the town grew rapidly to become the second largest city in Catalonia as the result of the brandy trade, for which it was an international reference point, as evidenced by the famous joke-phrase of an alleged “Reus, París i Londres (London)” axis. It was shortly after this, around the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, that the great Modernista buildings, which you can still see today and which make Reus a veritable Modernista stage, were erected.

The universally famous architect Antoni Gaudí i Cornet was born in Reus on 25th June 1852. It was in this city that the future architect lived as a child and teenager, made friends and went to school before moving to Barcelona. Some of his closest collaborators, such as the architects Joan Rubió i Bellvé, Domènec Sugranyes and Francesc Berenguer, and several of his future clients also came from the Reus area.

The city still retains the memory of the places the young Gaudí frequented during the time he lived in the town: the house where he was born, the church where he was baptised, the school he went to, the places where he used to meet his friends and collaborators. In short, the streets, squares, places and landscapes of the city that shaped the education of its great creative genius.

We suggest you also visit the “Gaudí & Reus” exhibition at the Museu Salvador Vilaseca which takes you through the origins of Gaudí and his family and introduces you to some of the most significant aspects of his personality and his way of understanding the world and architecture.

But it was the arrival of Lluís Domènech i Montaner, the other great architect of the era, that marked the start of the brilliant Modernista period in Reus when he began the plans to build the Pere Mata Psychiatric Institute in 1898. This was followed by other commissions and it was in Reus that Lluís Domènech i Montaner constructed more buildings than anywhere else apart from Barcelona. Of these, the most important are:


Pere Mata Institute (1898)

An innovative construction project involving an interesting combination of materials featuring brick, stone, wrought iron, ceramic and stained glass, and an innovative approach to patient care, in which the architect used a system of independent pavilions, something he repeated later on at the Hospital de Sant Pau in Barcelona. Pavilion number six, with its rich ornamentation, is the most valuable from an artistic point of view, as it retains its spectacular original Modernista decorative repertoire. The Pere Mata Institute, whose interior you can visit, is regarded as one of the jewels of Catalan Modernisme.


Casa Navàs (1901-1907)

Together with the Pere Mata Institute, this is the best example of the city’s architecture. It was commissioned by Joaquim Navàs, a local merchant. The beautiful façade, with different architectural and decorative elements inspired by Gothic and Plateresque, was damaged by a bomb during the Civil War, but the interior still keeps its magnificent decoration. The shop on the ground floor of the building is also very interesting, as the construction has survived virtually intact, and you can look round inside it.


Casa Rull (1900)

This house was designed for Pere Rull, a notary, and you can recognise various symbols on the façade to do with the original owner’s profession. Of special note are the angle formed by the two main façades and the elegant balcony with floral elements on the first floor. You can also visit the garden of this house.
Casa Gasull (1911)

This house was built for Fèlix Gasull, the owner of an oil-exporting firm, and contained the company’s warehouses as well as the family dwelling. This building is an early example of Modernisme combined with an incipient and sober Noucentisme.


There is no doubt that Modernista buildings erected in Reus were influenced by the architectural style of Domènech i Montaner. This effect is specially evident in the works designed by Pere Caselles, a municipal architect who had already worked with Domènech on the Pere Mata Institute and who designed a large number of both public and private buildings, including the Prat de la Riba Schools (1911), Casa Grau (1910), Casa Sagarra (1908), Casa Munné (1904), Casa Laguna (1904), Casa Tomàs Jordi (1909) and Casa Punyed (1900), and various industrial buildings such as the Abbatoir (begun by Francesc Borràs in 1889), and the Oenological Station (1906). Of the other architects who worked in Reus during this period, the most important were Joan Rubió i Bellvé, who was influenced by Gaudí’s style (Xalet Serra, 1911; Tuberculosis Dispensary, 1926, and Casa Serra, 1924), and Pere Domènech i Roura, the son of Domènech i Montaner (Casa Marco, 1926).

Patronat Municipal de Turisme i Comerç de Reus
(Reus Municipal Board of Tourism and Trade)



Architecture was the most representative form taken by these changes in style and ways of living, as it constituted a set of highly visible “modernities” encompassing both structure and the applied arts.

The Maresme shire developed dynamically into a broad range of productive sectors, mainly textiles and glass, liqueurs and wine-growing, while at the same time becoming a place where the Catalan bourgeoisie spent its summers and took the waters (the hot-water springs of Caldes d’Estrac and the medicinal springs of Argentona). It also attracted sailors and merchants returning from the Americas with the intention of settling down for good where they had originally come from.

Some of the creators of the architectural projects of Modernisme, such as Josep Puig i Cadafalch, Eduard Ferrés i Puig, Emili Cabanyes and Ignasi Mas i Morell, came from the Maresme, while others, such as Lluís Domènech i Montaner and Antoni M. Gallissà, made it their home. Their works display a rich variety of architectural types ranging from large summer residences, industrial buildings (factories, wine cellars) and shops to public commissions (town halls, markets, schools, abattoirs, children’s homes, churches, etc.). Josep Puig i Cadafalch and Lluís Domènech i Montaner were two of the leading exponents of Modernisme in Catalonia and were responsible for the fact that the Maresme has one of this movement’s most notable architectural heritages. In 2001, Mataró and Argentona, together with Barcelona, organised the Josep Puig i Cadafalch Year with various activities covering different cultural manifestations with a view to raising awareness about him and his outstanding work.

Mataró
Saló de Sessions de l’Ajuntament (1893), La Riera, 48. In 1893, Puig i Cadafalch, who at that time was working as a municipal architect in Mataró, drew up the plans for the renovation of the Sessions Hall in the town hall. Of particular note is the decoration of the panelled ceiling with beams adorned with coats-of-arms and emblematic symbols crossing each other.

The house where Puig i Cadafalch was born, El Carreró, 39. This house is an 18th century building known locally as a casa de cós, a long and narrow terraced house. A commemorative plaque on the façade, put up in 1967, recalls the figure of the illustrious architect. The façade was restored in 2001 on the occasion of Puig i Cadafalch Year.

El Rengle (1891-1893), Plaça Gran, s/n. The plans for this market building were drawn up by Emili Cabanyes, the municipal architect at that time. Puig i Cadafalch was responsible for renovating the semicircular roof decorated with ceramic tiles, open brickwork and wrought iron ornamental details.

La Confianza (1894-1896), Carrer de Sant Cristòfor, 10. This shop was commissioned by Francesc Palomer and opened in 1896. It sold pasta for soup and olive oil. Inside, the walls and ceiling of the shop are decorated with vegetable motifs and ornamental friezes and there are display cabinets with Neo-Gothic-style pinnacles, while outside it features a wrought iron sign with Modernista lettering.

Casa Parera (1894), Carrer Nou, 20. This building was renovated for Miquel Parera i Partagàs. It is a former two-storey casa de cós with floral and vegetable sgraffiti, exposed brickwork, wrought iron and medieval-type sculptural elements (corbels, coats-of-arms and gargoyles).

La Beneficència (1894), Carrer Sant Josep, 9. La Casa de la Beneficència, to give it its full name, was a poorhouse in the former Carmelite convent of Sant Josep, occupied at that time by the Conceptionists. Puig broke up the austere façade with large windows with corolla columns and medieval-inspired capitals, Neo-Gothic-style sculptural elements and the coats-of-arms of Mataró and Catalonia.

Casa Coll i Regàs (1896-1898), Carrer d’Argentona, 55-57. This house was commissioned by the Mataró businessman Joaquim Coll i Regàs. It is currently the headquarters of Fundació Caixa Laietana and the most emblematic Modernista building in town. In this building Puig i Cadafalch marshalled a comprehensive range of iconography and decoration with the intention of flattering his client, a prestigious textile industrialist.

Argentona
Puig i Cadafalch’s summer residence (1897-1905), Plaça de Vendre, s/n. This is the house where the architect used to spend the summer when he was little and where he later found refuge upon his return from exile in 1942. Puig opened up the party walls so as to join up what were originally three separate dwellings and make them into one. Of particular note are the Modernista elements such as the battlements, the sculptures and the broken-tile decoration (known as trencadís) on the chimneys.

Capella del Sagrament (1896-1897), Plaça de l’Església, 1. The new chapel is in Neo-Gothic style. It can be reached through a side door from the church of Sant Julià. The nave of the chapel has a rectangular ground plan, while the apse is built on a semi-hexagonal ground plan and roofed with lancet-arch vaults.

Can Calopa (1898), Carrer de Riudemeia, 8. This sixteenth-century manor house and ancestral home occupies four cóssos and has a pyramidal roof. According to Lluís Bonet i Garí, the plans for alterations to the building, which gave it its eclectic appearance, were drawn up by Puig i Cadafalch.

Casa Garí (1898), Camí de Sant Miquel del Cros, 9. This former Catalan country house was converted into a Nordic-inspired mansion for use as a summer residence in just nine months. Puig i Cadafalch was commissioned by Josep Garí i Cañas to take care of the architectural side of the transformation. Casa Garí was turned into veritable palace combining every luxury and facility (a theatre, gardens, a lake) with the image of a solid, fortified country house (two watchtowers facing south and a tower, with a sgraffito sundial on the wall, attached to the house).

Torre d’Aigües del Cros (1900), Avinguda Molí de les Mateves, s/n. This circular water-raising tower, shaped like a chimney, is made of clay bricks and has a roof decorated with broken tiles or trencadís. It supplied water to the Can Garí estate.

After this, the minibus takes you back to Mataró where the tour ends in Plaça de les Tereses.


Ajuntament d’Argentona
(Argentona Town Coucil)
Ajuntament de Mataró
(Mataró Town Council)
Actium Patrimoni Cultural, SL

 

THE RASPALL ROUTE, VALLÈS ORIENTAL

A suggestion for discovering the architecture of the summer residences in Vallès Oriental and the work of the architect Manuel Joaquim Raspall (1877-1954) in L’Ametlla, Cardedeu, La Garriga and Granollers.

The Modernisme of Summer Residences in Vallès Oriental: The Raspall Route
At the end of the 19th century, El Vallès Oriental was a shire that still had a strong agricultural base and timid industrial growth, highly focused on the capital, Granollers. However, its proximity to Barcelona and improved communication routes -local roads and two railway lines linking Barcelona to France- were at one and the same time key factors in triggering a process of development and transformation, and the cause and consequence of a phenomenon that characterised the small towns and villages of this area until well into the 20th century: the custom of city-dwellers to move out of Barcelona for the summer.


Rutes del Modernisme d'Estiueig al Vallès Oriental, Rutes Raspall

Address
Consell Comarcal del Vallès Oriental

Miquel Ricomà, 46

08401 Granollers
Visits, opening hours and prices

Vallès Oriental Modernist Route

LA GARRIGA

Thermal villa and summer resort

Thermal waters and the building of houses for summer vacations contributed to consolidate La Garriga as a holiday place, which has the most outstanding modernist set in the county - Raspall block, with four houses by this architect which have been declared National Cultural Heritage.

-Meeting point: Centre de Visitants (Carretera Nova, 46)

-Calendar: guided tours second Saturday of every month and tours under request.

-Visiting hour: 10 am. The guided tour is from 10 am to 12 pm.

-Price: 5€ for person.

-Contact by phone at 93 113 70 31 – 610 47 78 23

www.visitalagarriga.cat – info@visitalagarriga.cat


GRANOLLERS

Granollers in Modernism time

Granollers is a modern city that has grown as a commercial centre. At the beginning of the twentieth century some residential and public buildings were built, most of them by Raspall, the municipal architect.

- Meeting point: Granollers’ Museum (Anselm Clavé, 40)

-Calendar: information available at the website.

-Price: 4€ for person

-Contact by phone at 93 842 68 40

www.museugranollers.cat – museu@ajuntament.granollers.cat

CARDEDEU

Raspall and Cardedeu


Is one of the most important residential towns in Vallès Oriental County, the tour shows us the magnificent modernist houses surrounded by beautiful gardens.

- Meeting point: Museu Arxiu Tomàs Balvey (carrer Dr. Daurella, 1)

-Calendar: guided tours first Sunday from March to Jun and from October to November and tours under request.


-Visiting hour: 10.30h. The guided tour is 2 hours long.-Price: €7 for person

€5 for children from 6 to 12 years old and retired people.

-Contact by phone at 93 871 30 70

Getting there:

By train: RENFE, trains bound for Girona or Maçanet from Sants or Passeig de Gràcia stations. By bus: Sagalés company (tel.: 938 707 860). By car: road C-58 or highway AP-7 (exit Cardedeu).


www.museudecardedeu.cat –  museu@cardedeu.cat




FIGARÓ – MONTMANY

The tour shows us the tradition of being a summer holiday town with wonderful houses, as well as a place to go on excursions for nature and heritage.

-Meeting point: Tourist Information Office. El Molí de Ca l'Antic.

-Self guided tours every Saturday and Sunday and guided tours for groups under request.

-Contact by phone at 93 842 91 11

www.elfigaro.net

L’AMETLLA DEL VALLÈS

Ametlla’s Modernist route

The tour shows us the most peculiar modernist projects in the town. Most of them are form the first stage of M. J. Raspall.

-Meeting point: Town hall square.

-Calendar: guided tours first Sunday of every month and tours under request.

-Price: 3€ for person.

-Contact by phone at 93 843 25 01

www.ametlla.cat

- ametlla@ametlla.cat



Modernist Route discounts: 10% off the price of certain town routes.


Information
Tel.: 938 600 702

www.turismevalles.com

turisme@vallesoriental.cat

 
Further details
Timetables may vary.


From the middle of the 19th century onwards, this practice grew into a new form of leisure for the better-off classes in the cities, especially Barcelona. Although it began under the guise of therapeutic stays, by the 20th century it was simply a matter of people finding places away, but not too far, from their habitual residences, where they could engage in social life and enjoy a long period of holidays. The small towns and villages of El Vallès such as L’Ametlla, La Garriga and Cardedeu, which had hung on to their rural and agrarian character, gradually became attractive places to spend the summer on account of their nearness to Barcelona, their countryside and, above all, their therapeutic resources.

Doctors, lawyers, industrialists, financiers, politicians, people returning from the Americas having made their fortune and even artists, mainly from Barcelona, formed an emerging social class that was by no means compact, but had its own habits and ways of life defining it as a class. One of these habits was to go and spend the summer in places where they constituted a colony of summer residents. The colony was a clearly differentiated group within the life of each municipality. They dressed mainly in white, with parasols, hats, fans and sunglasses, frequented the Casino, the colony’s social hub and meeting point as well as an essential facility in every summer resort, and organised a range of activities, from dances and parties, plays and literary evenings to concerts, gymkhanas and excursions, not to mention all kinds of public and private events. Some of these were much talked-about, such as the two performances, including the première of the play La viola d’or (The Golden Viola) by Apel·les Mestres with music by Enric Morera, at the Teatre de la Natura in the Can Terres wood in La Garriga in 1911 and 1914, and the performance of the operetta Maruja by Amadeu Vives, in 1915, in the Vilalba wood in Cardedeu.

For small towns and villages such as L’Ametlla, La Garriga and Cardedeu, the summer residence phenomenon brought with it a considerable economic awakening that stimulated trade, direct relations with Barcelona, the development of services such as inns and spas and, above all, a boost to new construction and urban growth. The colony of summer residents needed new houses to stay in, either as owners or for rent, and these buildings had to incorporate the latest architectural trends of the time: Modernisme.

In L’Ametlla, La Garriga and Cardedeu magnificent homes were built in the Modernista style with lush gardens that today stand as testimony to a particular period. In these towns there are a large number of buildings, principally summer residences, by renowned architects of the time such as Eduard M. Balcells, Puig i Cadafalch, Jeroni Martorell, Emili Sala i Cortés and, above all, Joaquim Raspall, who had family connections with La Garriga.
M.J. Raspall i Mayol (1877-1954), a disciple of Domènech i Montaner and Puig i Cadafalch, is regarded as belonging to the second generation of Modernista architects. Most of his work, with a markedly singular style, is to be found in the small towns in El Vallès for which he worked as a municipal architect - in Cardedeu (1904), L’Ametlla del Vallès (1906), La Garriga (1906), Granollers (1907), Caldes de Montbui (1909) and later Montmeló (1924). In these municipalities he built remarkable houses in the Modernista style as well as carrying out public-sector works, including town planning, designs for urban furniture and even Cardedeu Municipal Cemetery.

Going round these towns will give you the chance to get to know Raspall’s Modernista architecture, evoke the time when the practice of moving residence for the summer was in fashion and discover municipalities that were transformed and acquired character in the early part of the 20th century. The suggested route, entitled The Modernisme of Summer Residences in El Vallès Oriental: The Raspall Route, will allow you to spend a whole day going through L’Ametlla, La Garriga and Cardedeu discovering interesting corners, singular buildings and above all Modernista architecture designed for people to spend and enjoy their summers in Vallès Oriental.

The guided tour sets off from Cardedeu at half past nine in the morning. It begins with a brief coach trip to L’Ametlla del Vallès, a small town of medieval origin that became a centre for summer residences in the early 20th century. The main feature of the visit to L’Ametlla is Casa Millet, a 14th century farmhouse that was converted by Raspall in 1908 into the summer residence of Joan Millet, a cotton industrialist and brother of Lluís Millet, director and joint founder of the Catalan choral society, L’Orfeó Català. The garden, the façade and the interesting fireplace in the dining room are testimony to the architect’s most Modernista period.

After a guided walk and time for a coffee, the route continues to La Garriga, a watering place ever since Roman times and the town where most of the Modernista architecture in El Vallès Oriental is concentrated. A selection of over twenty houses will take you back to the time when it was the fashion to move out of the city in the summer, and give you the chance to enjoy the garden of Casa Barbey (1910), a house which the textile industrialist Juli Barbey built and is today one of the foremost examples of the Modernista movement outside the Barcelona area. Casa Barbey and the neighbouring buildings of Torre Iris (1911), La Bombonera (1910) and Casa Barraquer (1912-13) form the so-called Illa Raspall, or Raspall Block, a unique set of buildings in Catalonia now listed as of National Interest.

From La Garriga you go back to Cardedeu, stopping off at the municipal cemetery, one of the most interesting and remarkable pieces of funereal architecture in Catalonia. After an optional lunch, the route continues through the centre of Cardedeu with visits to Alqueria Cloelia (1904), the first private-sector work by Raspall, the gardens of Casa Viader (1917-1922), commissioned by Marc Viader, father of the Cacaolat inventor, the locally famous chocolate drink, and an exclusive visit to the entrance hall and library of Casa Golferichs-Rovellat (1908), which boasts a noteworthy set of glasswork with leaded stained-glass windows featuring completely Modernista figures and patterns.

The route is open to all types of groups and individuals and has special educational variants for school parties.



Modernisme d’Estiueig al Vallès Oriental (The Modernisme of Summer Residences in El Vallès Oriental)
Ajuntament de l’Ametlla (L’Ametlla Town Council)
Ajuntament de Cardedeu (Cardedeu Town Council)
Ajuntament de la Garriga (La Garriga Town Council)
Ajuntament de Granollers (Granollers Town Council)
Consorci de Turisme del Vallès Oriental (Vallès Oriental Tourist Board)


SITGES

For Sitges , the 19th century was a period of prosperity full of social, economic, technological and cultural changes, as it was for the rest of the Garraf shire, of which it is a part. The arrival of the railway, the export of wine by sea, the South American adventure, urban development and the bourgeoning of architectural styles made a major impact on this small Catalan coastal town.

Between 1892 and 1899 Sitges became a meeting place for Modernista artists following the arrival of Santiago Rusiñol i Prats in 1891. The painter (Barcelona 1861 - Aranjuez 1931), settled down to live here in Cau Ferrat having been attracted by the town’s scenary, by its inhabitants and by the colony of painters belonging to the Luminist school that already existed there.

Having been taken into their midst by these painters, Rusiñol organised five Festes Modernistes (Modernista Festivals) that brought the leading writers, musicians, critics, sculptors and artists in Catalonia to Sitges and turned this small seafaring town into “the Mecca of Modernisme” as it came to be called. In the summer of 1892, the First Fine Arts Exhibition, subsequently known as the First Modernista Festival, was held in the town hall. The exhibition included works by local artists, Ramon Casas, Eliseu Meifrèn and Santiago Rusiñol, all of whom were very significant figures in the Modernista movement.

Sitges

Address
Oficina Maricel Fonollar, s/n 08870 Sitges. Oficina Oasis Sinia Morera, 1 08870 Sitges.
Opening hours and visits
Maricel Office: Monday to Friday, from 9am to 2pm and 4pm to 6.30pm. From June through September, daily from 9am to 9pm . Scheduled visits every Sunday. Visits only start if the group is at least 5 people. Groups may book private visits for any day all year round.
Information
Modernista tour information and bookings:

Tel.: 619 793 199

info@sitgestur.com

www.agisitges.cat

General Tourist information at Maricel Office:

Tel.: 938 110 611

Oasis office (hotel bookings):

Tel.: 938 944 251

Fax: 938 944 305
Getting there
By train: RENFE trains bound for Vilanova or Sant Vicenç de Calders, from Sants or Passeig de Gràcia stations.
By bus: Mon Bus company (tel.: 938 937 060) leaving from Ronda Universitat.
By car: toll road C-32 (Garraf tunnels) or road C-31.

Prices and discounts
Prices

Adults: €10.00

Children under 18 years of age: €5.00

0 to 12 years of age: free.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 10% off the adult price.

The Modernista artists were keen to open themselves up to Europe and its cultural movements and Rusiñol and the group around the magazine L’Avenç organised the Second Modernista Festival with this object in mind. Taking the Belgian creators as reference point and in close collaboration with Enric Morera, who had trained as an artist in Brussels, they staged The Intruder, a work by the young Belgian playwright Maeterlinck, at the Casino Prado theatre. Music featured prominently at this Festival and there was a concert with works by César Frank and Enric Morera.

The Third Modernista Festival, borne along by confidence in the victory of Modernista ideals, was held in November 1894 and was very different from the other two. The events comprising the Festival were a procession bringing two paintings by Doménikos Theotokópoulos, El Greco, to Sitges and the official opening of Cau Ferrat, Rusiñol’s studio. The procession, organised by Rusiñol, was a demonstration of the excitement Rusiñol and his friends experienced at the sight of the works by El Greco, which they felt they had to show in popular fashion. These paintings, which Rusiñol bought from Pau Bosch in Paris, are now in the Cau Ferrat Museum. Once Cau Ferrat had been officially opened, a lunch was held nearby, at La Torreta, on the rocks, and then, after a speech by Rusiñol, a literary competition began during which Joan Maragall recited his “decadentist” verses, which were later to be regarded as the beginning of a new genre of poetry.

Music was the star of the Fourth Modernista Festival which took place on 14 February 1897, this time returning to the Casino Prado where a portrait of Enric Morera by Santiago Rusiñol hung in the foyer. The events began with a symphonic poem by Mercè Vidal, and the Canadian Dances by Paul Gibson, following which Rusiñol made a speech defending Modernista music. The Festival ended with the première of the opera La Fada (The Fairy), with a libretto by Jaume Massó i Torrents and music by Enric Morera. This was the most important event of the Fourth Modernista Festival.

The Fifth Modernista Festival, held in August 1899, staged two plays by Ignasi Iglésias, Lladres (Thieves) and La reina del cor (The Queen of the Heart), and one by Santiago Rusiñol, L’alegria que passa (Passing Joy). The pianist Joaquim Nin played works by Scarlatti, Grieg, Alió, Gay and Morera.

Sitges Modernista Route
The Modernista Route allows you to discover the imprint Modernisme left on Sitges as a result of the initiatives by Santiago Rusiñol and the wealth of the so-called americanos - local people who returned from the Spanish colonies having made their fortunes and embellished the streets of the town with their Modernista-style houses.

The Route begins at the train station, the symbol of the new era and the country’s modernity. It continues along the streets running through the town centre -Carrer de l’Illa de Cuba and Carrer de Francesc Gumà- where you can discover the Modernista constructions of some of the most outstanding architects of the time, such as Gaietà Buïgas, and where you can enjoy the decoration of some of the frontages (wrought iron work, ceramics, sgrafitti, stained glass windows, etc.). The buildings here include Casa Bonaventura Blay (1901), Casa Manuel Planas (1908) and Casa Pere Carreras (1906). If at all possible, you should take a look inside the Teatre Prado, a Modernista building where two of the Modernista Festivals organised by Rusiñol in Sitges were held and a meeting point for many of those involved.

The Route continues with a visit to a blue courtyard, the sole surviving example of the once typical Sitges courtyards, which was a source of inspiration for Rusiñol, who not only painted several pictures of it, but also based a play on it entitled El pati blau (The Blue Courtyard). You continue along Cap de la Vila to see another of the Modernista houses, one that once belonged to the americano Bartomeu Carbonell i Mussons. Next you come to Plaça de l’Ajuntament where the principal constructions are the Town Hall, featuring a Neo-Gothic style much used by the Modernista artists, and the market, the first Modernista building in Sitges.

The visit ends at the Cau Ferrat Museum, which was once the house-cum-studio of artist and art collector Santiago Rusiñol. Inside there is a large number of paintings by El Greco, Ramon Casas, Ignacio Zuloaga, Picasso and Rusiñol, among many others, as well as an extensive collection of wrought iron, ceramic and glass items.

Patronat Municipal de Turisme de Sitges
(Sitges Municipal Tourist Board)

 

 

TERRASSA

Industrial and Modernista Terrassa

The origins of the industrial transformation of Terrassa go back to the first third of the 19th century and have to do mainly with the expansion of the woollen textile industry. Technical improvements began with the introduction of spinning machines (1832) and steam engines (1833). Not long after this, from 1845 onwards, came the Jacquard looms that were to play a key part in the expansion of the textile industry. This development was aided by improved transport, including the building of a new road to Barcelona in 1845, but particularly by the arrival of the northern railway in 1856 linking Terrassa to Barcelona, Manresa and Saragossa. This new means of transport made it easier for raw materials, such as coal and wool, to be brought in and for the finished textile products to be sent out to the markets of Catalonia and the rest of Spain.

Major transformations occurred in the development, demography and society of the town. Terrassa expanded beyond its medieval structure towards Estació del Nord and, more importantly, by the early 20th century it had broken out of its traditional natural watercourse boundaries, Riera del Palau and Torrent de Vallparadís.

The usual idea of industrial heritage includes the most emblematic buildings where the industrial processes were actually carried out. In the case of the textile industry, this heritage comprises the chimneys, the steam-powered factories, the mills and the warehouses
Terrassa

Address
Ajuntament de Terrassa - Oficina de Turisme

Freixa i Argemí, 11.

08224 Terrassa.
Opening hours and visits
Guided tours (previous booking required), the second Saturday of month except January, August and December.

Tour starts at 10.15am at the Terrassa Tourist Office (Masia Freixa), and lasts approximately 3 hours.
Information
Tel.: 937 397 019

Fax: 937 397 063

www.visitaterrassa.cat

turisme@terrassa.cat
Getting there
By train: FGC trains bound for Terrassa and Manresa, from Plaça de Catalunya station; RENFE trains bound for Manresa from Sants or Plaça Catalunya stations.
By car: road C-58 (exit Terrassa-centre).

Prices and discounts
Prices. Adults: €12.46.

Children aged 7 to 16: €10.04.

Children up to 7 years of age: free.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 30% off the price of the guided tour.

Groups:

Guided tours for travel agencies, entities, companies, institutions, associations and others groups. Any day of the week, except Mondays.

Prices:

€37.21/hour weekdays and €40.95/hour weekends and public holidays.
Description


Major transformations occurred in the development, demography and society of the town. Terrassa expanded beyond its medieval structure towards Estació del Nord and, more importantly, by the early 20th century it had broken out of its traditional natural watercourse boundaries, Riera del Palau and Torrent de Vallparadís.



The usual idea of industrial heritage includes the most emblematic buildings where the industrial processes were actually carried out. In the case of the textile industry, this heritage comprises the chimneys, the steam-powered factories, the mills and the warehouses.



Terrassa is the Catalan city where the largest number of items belonging to its textile industry heritage are still in existence. This concerns not just to the buildings recognised as being industrial as such, but also the development and creation of a town that grew out of a medieval structure, with everything that entails. All this can be seen in the layout of the streets, in the number and location of the steam-powered factories, in the mills and warehouses, but also in the workers’ dwellings -with all their different types and particular characteristics- and in the facilities set up to service industry and inhabitants, such as the railway station, the banks, the electricity supply, the hospital, the market, the hotels and the schools. It can even be seen in the spaces dedicated to supplying food and other services, or leisure and recreation, such as shops, chemists’, tobacconists’, fire stations, the casino, clubs, choral societies, cinemas and theatres. And it can also be seen in some of the items of street elements or the streets themselves with their cobblestones, pavements, lampposts, electrical items and carriage entrances.

Many of these industrial elements have survived in Terrassa to this day. Some of them are quite interesting taken separately, but overall they represent one of the most outstanding collections of industrial heritage in Catalonia.

Architectural Modernisme in Terrassa

Modernisme in architecture is generally characterised by the predominance of curved lines over straight lines -the use of parabolic and elliptical arches, the Catalan vault in the space between girders, and rounded edges-, the wealth and detail of the decoration, the frequent use of vegetable motifs and the dynamism of the shapes. The most commonly used materials are plain brickwork (although stucco and stone are also to be found), decorative ceramics, wrought iron and sgraffiti. These general features also apply to Terrassa, especially in the essentially practical and functional aspects of the use of the buildings. The exterior decorations are usually austere, whereas the interiors are finely decorated with ceramic banisters, leaded stained glass, woodwork and ironwork.

The local exhibition at the Real Colegio Tarrasense in 1883 marked the start of the renovation of the plastic arts in Terrassa. This initial boost paved the way for the introduction of new artistic currents imported from Europe that arrived via Barcelona: Art Nouveau and the Modern Style. The highpoint of this new Modernista style in the town was the exhibition at Palau d’Indústries (now Escola Industrial) in 1904 with the applied arts particularly prominent. Local artist Joaquim Vancells and Alexandre de Riquer from Barcelona made a decisive contribution to the spread of Modernisme to painting and ornamentation in Terrassa.

However the extension and spread of this style in the city are due to the architects Lluís Muncunill and Josep M. Coll i Bacardí, and, to a lesser extent, Melcior Vinyals and Antoni Pascual i Carretero. It was these professionals, together with builders and craftsmen, who transformed the city with public buildings, factories, warehouses and private dwellings. This transformation occurred at the same time as the industrial development and the cultural and artistic concerns of the bourgeoisie of the moment. This style survived in Terrassa practically until the 1930s, beyond the limits usually attributed to the movement.

Outstanding among the early Art Nouveau works in Terrassa are the plans for the assembly hall of the Industrial Institute, with mural paintings by Alexandre de Riquer (1901) that were finished by Joaquim Vancells (1904) following a disagreement with the Institute. The decoration by Vancells remains in place and the central painting, by Riquer, is today in the dining room of Casa Alegre de Sagrera. The versatile Joaquim Vancells has also left us several projects in this style: the furniture in the dining room and office of Masia Freixa, the paintings on the stairs of Casa Alegre de Sagrera and the overall design of Confiteria Vídua Carné. The rooting of the Modernista style in Terrassa as applied to the town’s industrial heritage is linked to the work of the most prolific local architect of the period: Lluís Muncunill.

The “Industrial and Modernista Terrassa” Route

This Route includes the town’s 25 most representative buildings and monuments. Since they are all fairly close together, they can be visited on foot in half a day. The former Vapor Aymerich, Amat i Jover, once one of the most spectacular factories in Europe and now home to the Museum of Science and Technique of Catalonia, was designed by Lluís Muncunill (1907). It still has a very impressive 11,000 square metre bay, the engine room, the chimney and the old coal bunkers. This former steam-powered factory shows you what the world of the workers and industry was like at that time before going on to buildings that bring you closer to the daily life of the city and its bourgeoisie. Next you go down Rambla d’Ègara to Mercat de la Independència (1906), which has a metal structure and remarkable wrought iron decoration. Continuing along Raval de Montserrat you come to the former Confiteria Carné, originally a sweet shop, now a chemists’ called Farmàcia Albiñana, and an extraordinary example of Modernista decorative arts; the former headquarters of the Societat General d’Electricitat (now converted into a restaurant); the Town Hall (l’Ajuntament), a Neo-Gothic-style building (1903). The former Industrial Institute and Magatzem Cortès i Prat (1897) are the most noteworthy buildings until you come to Casa Alegre de Sagrera. This building (dating from the early 19th century, but renovated in 1911 and now part of the Museum of Terrassa) was the residence of an old family of industrialists and is an example of an extremely eclectic Modernista style. The outstanding interior features include paintings by Joaquim Vancells i Pere Viver, woodwork, leaded stained glass and glass work, and the great Modernista paintings by Alexandre de Riquer in the dining room. A visit to Gran Casino (1920), a recently restored sumptuous building, is a must. On the way to the building and gardens of the Industrial Institute (the former Pasqual Sala store, 1893) you will see various houses that retain the spirit of the industrial Terrassa of a hundred years ago: Casa Concepció Monset, Casa Baltasar Gorina and Cases de Cal Maurí (a group of humble dwellings for workers, one of the few still remaining in Catalonia). The Teatre Principal is another landmark on the route through Modernista Terrassa. This is a monumental building erected in 1911. Old stores and houses (Magatzem Francesc Roig, Magatzem Emili Matalonga, Casa Jacint Bosch, Magatzem Joaquim Alegre, Magatzem Torras, etc.) accompany you on your way to Carrer de la Rasa, where you will find the section of the Ventalló factory, which has been converted into a public space and a residential area including a square with arcades, the Marcet i Poal factory (1920) and warehouse (1914), and, finally, the section of the Izard factory (1921), a spectacular building that opens onto Plaça Didó and is now home to the Sala d’Exposicions Muncunill (Muncunill Exhibitions Hall) in what was once the factory’s dyeing room. The route ends in the middle of Parc de Sant Jordi at Masia Freixa (1905-1910), the former residence and also factory of the Freixa family, designed by Lluís Muncunill.



Ajuntament de Terrassa

(Terrassa Town Council)

 

Terrassa is the Catalan city where the largest number of items belonging to its textile industry heritage are still in existence. This concerns not just to the buildings recognised as being industrial as such, but also the development and creation of a town that grew out of a medieval structure, with everything that entails. All this can be seen in the layout of the streets, in the number and location of the steam-powered factories, in the mills and warehouses, but also in the workers’ dwellings -with all their different types and particular characteristics- and in the facilities set up to service industry and inhabitants, such as the railway station, the banks, the electricity supply, the hospital, the market, the hotels and the schools. It can even be seen in the spaces dedicated to supplying food and other services, or leisure and recreation, such as shops, chemists’, tobacconists’, fire stations, the casino, clubs, choral societies, cinemas and theatres. And it can also be seen in some of the items of street elements or the streets themselves with their cobblestones, pavements, lampposts, electrical items and carriage entrances.

Many of these industrial elements have survived in Terrassa to this day. Some of them are quite interesting taken separately, but overall they represent one of the most outstanding collections of industrial heritage in Catalonia.

Architectural Modernisme in Terrassa
Modernisme in architecture is generally characterised by the predominance of curved lines over straight lines -the use of parabolic and elliptical arches, the Catalan vault in the space between girders, and rounded edges-, the wealth and detail of the decoration, the frequent use of vegetable motifs and the dynamism of the shapes. The most commonly used materials are plain brickwork (although stucco and stone are also to be found), decorative ceramics, wrought iron and sgraffiti. These general features also apply to Terrassa, especially in the essentially practical and functional aspects of the use of the buildings. The exterior decorations are usually austere, whereas the interiors are finely decorated with ceramic banisters, leaded stained glass, woodwork and ironwork.
The local exhibition at the Real Colegio Tarrasense in 1883 marked the start of the renovation of the plastic arts in Terrassa. This initial boost paved the way for the introduction of new artistic currents imported from Europe that arrived via Barcelona: Art Nouveau and the Modern Style. The highpoint of this new Modernista style in the town was the exhibition at Palau d’Indústries (now Escola Industrial) in 1904 with the applied arts particularly prominent. Local artist Joaquim Vancells and Alexandre de Riquer from Barcelona made a decisive contribution to the spread of Modernisme to painting and ornamentation in Terrassa.

However the extension and spread of this style in the city are due to the architects Lluís Muncunill and Josep M. Coll i Bacardí, and, to a lesser extent, Melcior Vinyals and Antoni Pascual i Carretero. It was these professionals, together with builders and craftsmen, who transformed the city with public buildings, factories, warehouses and private dwellings. This transformation occurred at the same time as the industrial development and the cultural and artistic concerns of the bourgeoisie of the moment. This style survived in Terrassa practically until the 1930s, beyond the limits usually attributed to the movement.

Outstanding among the early Art Nouveau works in Terrassa are the plans for the assembly hall of the Industrial Institute, with mural paintings by Alexandre de Riquer (1901) that were finished by Joaquim Vancells (1904) following a disagreement with the Institute. The decoration by Vancells remains in place and the central painting, by Riquer, is today in the dining room of Casa Alegre de Sagrera. The versatile Joaquim Vancells has also left us several projects in this style: the furniture in the dining room and office of Masia Freixa, the paintings on the stairs of Casa Alegre de Sagrera and the overall design of Confiteria Vídua Carné. The rooting of the Modernista style in Terrassa as applied to the town’s industrial heritage is linked to the work of the most prolific local architect of the period: Lluís Muncunill.

The “Industrial and Modernista Terrassa” Route
This Route includes the town’s 25 most representative buildings and monuments. Since they are all fairly close together, they can be visited on foot in half a day. The former Vapor Aymerich, Amat i Jover, once one of the most spectacular factories in Europe and now home to the Museum of Science and Technique of Catalonia, was designed by Lluís Muncunill (1907). It still has a very impressive 11,000 square metre bay, the engine room, the chimney and the old coal bunkers. This former steam-powered factory shows you what the world of the workers and industry was like at that time before going on to buildings that bring you closer to the daily life of the city and its bourgeoisie. Next you go down Rambla d’Ègara to Mercat de la Independència (1906), which has a metal structure and remarkable wrought iron decoration. Continuing along Raval de Montserrat you come to the former Confiteria Carné, originally a sweet shop, now a chemists’ called Farmàcia Albiñana, and an extraordinary example of Modernista decorative arts; the former headquarters of the Societat General d’Electricitat (now converted into a restaurant); the Town Hall (l’Ajuntament), a Neo-Gothic-style building (1903). The former Industrial Institute (now Centre Excursionista) and Magatzem Cortès i Prat (1897) are the most noteworthy buildings until you come to Casa Alegre de Sagrera. This building (dating from the early 19th century, but renovated in 1911 and now part of the Museum of Terrassa) was the residence of an old family of industrialists and is an example of an extremely eclectic Modernista style. The outstanding interior features include paintings by Joaquim Vancells i Pere Viver, woodwork, leaded stained glass and glass work, and the great Modernista paintings by Alexandre de Riquer in the dining room. A visit to Gran Casino (1920), a recently restored sumptuous building, is a must. On the way to the building and gardens of the Industrial Institute (the former Pasqual Sala store, 1893) you will see various houses that retain the spirit of the industrial Terrassa of a hundred years ago: Casa Concepció Monset, Casa Baltasar Gorina and Cases de Cal Maurí (a group of humble dwellings for workers, one of the few still remaining in Catalonia). The Teatre Principal is another landmark on the route through Modernista Terrassa. This is a monumental building erected in 1911 and now in disuse. Old stores and houses (Magatzem Francesc Roig, Magatzem Emili Matalonga, Casa Jacint Bosch, Magatzem Joaquim Alegre, Magatzem Torras, etc.) accompany you on your way to Carrer de la Rasa, where you will find the section of the Ventalló factory, which has been converted into a public space and a residential area including a square with arcades, the Marcet i Poal factory (1920) and warehouse (1914), and, finally, the section of the Izard factory (1921), a spectacular building that opens onto Plaça Didó and is now home to the Sala d’Exposicions Muncunill (Muncunill Exhibitions Hall) in what was once the factory’s dyeing room. The route ends in the middle of Parc de Sant Jordi at Masia Freixa (1905-1910), the former residence and also factory of the Freixa family, designed by Lluís Muncunill.




Ajuntament de Terrassa
(Terrassa Town Council)

 

 

THE VILAFRANCA DEL PENEDÈS MODERNISTA ROUTE

Modernisme in Vilafranca del Penedès
The economic resurgence of the Alt Penedès, after a plague of phylloxeras had destroyed the vineyards, the basis of the shire’s economy, paved the way for the arrival of the artistic and social current that was beginning to take hold in Europe. Farm owners and merchants became the receivers of Modernista trends and had buildings put up in keeping with their economic position.

Towards the end of the 19th century, Vilafranca begun its transformation from a village into a small town as new buildings sprang up, changing its traditional image, and plans were laid for a new type of town. Renowned architects took over from master builders and there emerged the figures of Santiago Güell, Eugeni Campllonch and Antoni Pons. Santiago Güell (Vilafranca, 1869) was the municipal architect and played an active part in the political life of Vilafranca. As an architect he was scrupulous and a perfectionist. It was he who left the biggest imprint on the town, creating the town’s image and designing many of its most emblematic buildings. These buildings were characterised by mastery of the architectural technique and personal touches which he applied to his works with sobriety, elegance and balance.
Vilafranca del Penedès

Address
Tourist Office

Hermenegild Clascar, 2.

08720 Vilafranca del Penedès.
Opening hours and visits
Guided visits in downtown Vilafranca, 2012:

    February 5

    March 4

    May 6

    June 3

    November 4   

    December 2

Previous booking required.

Privately booked visits are available all year round for groups of at least 8 people.
Information
Tel.: 938 181 254
Fax: 938 181 479
turisme@vilafranca.org
www.turismevilafranca.com

Getting there
By train: RENFE trains bound for Sant Vicenç de Calders or Vilafranca itself, from Sants or Passeig de Gràcia stations.
By bus: Hispano Igualadina company (tel.: 938 044 451).
By road: toll highways AP2 and AP7 (exit 29), or road N-340.

Prices and discounts
Prices. Adults: €5.00.

Retired: 50% discount.

Children up to 12 years of age: free.

The visit includes visit inside Casa Miró.

Discount of the Modernisme Route: 15%.
Description
Modernisme in Vilafranca del Penedès

The economic resurgence of the Alt Penedès, after a plague of phylloxeras had destroyed the vineyards, the basis of the shire’s economy, paved the way for the arrival of the artistic and social current that was beginning to take hold in Europe. Farm owners and merchants became the receivers of Modernista trends and had buildings put up in keeping with their economic position.

Towards the end of the 19th century, Vilafranca begun its transformation from a village into a small town as new buildings sprang up, changing its traditional image, and plans were laid for a new type of town. Renowned architects took over from master builders and there emerged the figures of Santiago Güell, Eugeni Campllonch and Antoni Pons. Santiago Güell (Vilafranca, 1869) was the municipal architect and played an active part in the political life of Vilafranca. As an architect he was scrupulous and a perfectionist. It was he who left the biggest imprint on the town, creating the town’s image and designing many of its most emblematic buildings. These buildings were characterised by mastery of the architectural technique and personal touches which he applied to his works with sobriety, elegance and balance.

Modernista architecture in Vilafranca combines popular Catalan architecture with the traits typical of Modernisme, which contributed new materials and a new conception of space. On the route through Modernista Vilafranca you will be able to see the colourful naturalistic decoration of the façades, the use of exposed brickwork on some buildings and the stained glass and wrought iron railings on windows and balconies.

Vilafranca’s Modernista heritage comprises 33 buildings of the most varied kinds: ancestral homes, public buildings and warehouses catering for the export of wines and liqueurs, clear exponents of the importance of industrial architecture in its own right.

Modernisme also embraced other aspects of art such as painting, sculpture and urban furniture design. As you walk along Carrer de Santa Maria, right in the centre of Vilafranca, you will see some singular examples of this latter type in the form of streetlamps. If you go into the Crypt of the Basilica you will find an excellent sculpture by Josep Llimona and in the Vilafranca Museum there are drawings by Ricard Opisso as well as works by other Modernista artists.

This Vilafranca route allows you to learn about the impact this cultural movement had at the turn of the century through the new symbols of progress and modernity contributed by the innovative trend called Modernisme.


Patronat Municipal de Comerç i Turisme (Municipal Trade and Tourism Board)

Modernista architecture in Vilafranca combines popular Catalan architecture with the traits typical of Modernisme, which contributed new materials and a new conception of space. On the route through Modernista Vilafranca you will be able to see the colourful naturalistic decoration of the façades, the use of exposed brickwork on some buildings and the stained glass and wrought iron railings on windows and balconies.

Vilafranca’s Modernista heritage comprises 33 buildings of the most varied kinds: ancestral homes, public buildings and warehouses catering for the export of wines and liqueurs, clear exponents of the importance of industrial architecture in its own right.

Modernisme also embraced other aspects of art such as painting, sculpture and urban furniture design. As you walk along Carrer de Santa Maria, right in the centre of Vilafranca, you will see some singular examples of this latter type in the form of streetlamps. If you go into the Crypt of the Basilica you will find an excellent sculpture by Josep Llimona and in the Vilafranca Museum there are drawings by Ricard Opisso as well as works by other Modernista artists.

This Vilafranca route allows you to learn about the impact this cultural movement had at the turn of the century through the new symbols of progress and modernity contributed by the innovative trend called Modernisme.



Patronat Municipal de Comerç i Turisme
(Municipal Trade and Tourism Board)

www.pi2.com